Teaching Strategy: Which Portrait Should Stay?

Helping students to define and justify significance

Students imagine they are re-organising a gallery. They have to choose between the portraits of two well-known individuals – only one of them can stay on the wall. First, they write down what they think they already know about the two. Then they look at sources to find out more and to find arguments for their choice. This means defining the historical significance of each. Continue reading Teaching Strategy: Which Portrait Should Stay?

Teaching Strategy: Analysing People’s Motives

Helping students to compare and contrast motives

Where many historical actors are involved in the same event or change, the skill of multiperspectivity can be trained by analysing the motives of each of them very carefully. This brings out for students the common goals as well as the factors that distinguish the motives of some from the others. Historical actors may refer to both individuals and groups, such as nations. Continue reading Teaching Strategy: Analysing People’s Motives

Teaching Strategy: Developing a Sense of Place

Helping students to develop a sense of place and period, a crucial part of thinking historically

Students often have problems thinking historically because they do not know enough about the time and place they are trying to think about. For example, how can we expect a student to analyse propaganda posters from World War One if they have no idea what the values and attitudes of society were at the time? Continue reading Teaching Strategy: Developing a Sense of Place