How to make things stick? Three volunteers.

Helping students to revise chronology

The teacher provides ten items (on separate pieces of paper) that need to be put in the right chronological order. Three volunteers do this together, e.g. by sticking the pieces of paper on the wall. When they are done, the class may ask them questions/ask them to justify their results. Continue reading How to make things stick? Three volunteers.

Click2Map

www.click2map.com is a simple to use tool enabling you, or your students, to create annotated maps.

We have used it with students who need to revise the battles of the Western Front. Students posted the key facts and a picture onto a map. The process of looking up the information from their notes and locating each battle correctly was useful revision in itself, and they now have a saved map to revise from for their exams. Continue reading Click2Map

Digital platforms: teaching your history students beyond the classroom!

A quick review of the landscape!

When I was at school (at some time in the far and distant past), no teacher could continue to teach me from a distance. I was a good student, so my file was always in order, but I can’t say I really had a clear sense of the whole course I was studying. All my notes were paper based.

I am increasingly a teacher who continues to teach my students when they are out of school. I organise them and show them where what they are learning fits into a course plan. I teach using a range of media. All this is possible because of the many digital platforms out there. Continue reading Digital platforms: teaching your history students beyond the classroom!

Teaching Strategy: Which Portrait Should Stay?

Helping students to define and justify significance

Students imagine they are re-organising a gallery. They have to choose between the portraits of two well-known individuals – only one of them can stay on the wall. First, they write down what they think they already know about the two. Then they look at sources to find out more and to find arguments for their choice. This means defining the historical significance of each. Continue reading Teaching Strategy: Which Portrait Should Stay?